Courses

Academic Calendar

Full Academic Calendars (taken right from the Registrar's website)
Lehigh University Course Catalog


Fall 2019: Required Courses & Non-Required/Elective Courses
 
WGSS 001-10 Gender and Society  (SS , 4 credits) CBE Diversity CRN 42023
T, R 9:20 - 10:35 a.m.  
Staff
 
WGSS, ART 121-10 Women in Art  (HU , 4 credits)  CRN 43513
M, W 9:50 - 11:05 a.m.  
Professor Gans
 
WGSS, HIST 124-10 Women in America  (SS , 4 credits) CBE Diversity CRN 43384
T, R 3:00 - 4:15 p.m.  
Professor Najar 
 
WGSS, SOC 127-10 Human Sexuality  (SS , 4 credits) CBE Diversity CRN 44690
T, R 10:45 - 12:00 p.m.  
Professor Lindemann
 
WGSS, SOC 128 Race, Gender and Work (SS) 4 credits CRN44919
Race, Gender and Work is a class designed to help students understand racial and gender inequalities as they relate specifically to work and employment. We explore the origins and histories of inequalities, the ways in which inequalities persist and/or change today, and what steps might be taken toward creating a more equal society.
M, W 7:55 - 9:10 a.m.
Professor Krasas
 
WGSS, ENGL 198-10 Getting Graphic:  Gender and Visual Narrative  (HU , 4 credits)  CRN 44652
Superheroes and pop culture characters often get all the attention at ComicCon- but what voices are missing from the flashy posters and cosplay conventions? What happens when comics get serious and the popular gets political? This course seeks to answer these questions as it addresses the graphic novel as a serious medium with its own language of interpretation. It explores the use of the graphic novel in narratives ranging from the personal to the supernatural and asks what the graphic form uniquely adds to discussions of gender issues around the world. From the re-telling of a goddess’s immolation in Sita’s Ramayana to illustrating the narratives of native women in Deer Women, this course equips students for interpreting the personal and the political in the graphic novel while building a portfolio of visual storytelling. No prior experience with art or comic books required.
M, W 1:35 - 2:50 p.m.  
Professor Mizin
 
WGSS 271-10 Independent Reading and Research  (HU, SS , 1-4 credits)  CRN 42024 Instructor permission required.
WGSS Faculty
 
WGSS, MLL, GERM, FILM 296-10 Lovers in a Dangerous Time  (HU , 4 credits)  CRN 43227
In this course we will explore love and desire and its challenges through the lens of a century of German film. The story of forbidden love can be traced through German film from its earlier period in the 1920s all the way to the present and it offers a universal frame for thinking about history’s dangerous times. How do wars, walls, genocide, homophobia, and racism shape and break love during Germany’s tumultuous twentieth-century history? Film will show us these points of connectivity and fracture.
M, W 3:00 - 4:15 p.m.  
Professor Landry
 
WGSS 330-10 Internship in Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies  (SS , 1-4 credits)  CRN 42025 Instructor permission required.
WGSS Faculty
 
WGSS, PSYC, HMS 334-10 The Psychology of Body Image and Eating Disorders  (SS , 4 credits)  CRN 44492
W 7:15 - 9:55 p.m.  Open only to WGSS majors/minors
Professor Lomauro
 
WGSS 373-10 Internship On-Campus (Center for Gender Equity)  (SS , 1-3 credits)  CRN 42026 Instructor permission required.
Professor Jones
 
WGSS 373-11 Internship On-Campus (Center for Gender Violence and Education)  (SS , 1-3 credits)  CRN 43034
Instructor permission required.
Professor DeSipio
 
WGSS 373-12 Internship On-Campus (Pride Center)  (SS , 1-3 credits)  CRN 43103 Instructor permission required.
Professor Gilbert
 
WGSS, AAS 396/496-10 From Lena Horne to Lemonade: Black Feminism and Media Industries  (SS , 4/3 credits) CBE Diversity
CRN 43734/43738
From the Oscar-winning documentary 20 Feet from Stardom to Lifetime’s six-part investigative series Surviving R.Kelly, recent media has highlighted the particular injustices and inequities faced by black women in the popular music industry and media industries more broadly. This course historicizes the place of black women within media industries, introduces students to Black Feminist Thought, and unpacks key concepts such as hypervisibility, intersectionality, womanism, and hegemony. Altogether, it explores how difference and inequity are manifest in (and sometimes challenged by) work in the creative industries, specifically music, television, and film
T, 4:25 p.m. - 7:05 p.m .  
Professor Vilanova
 
WGSS, HMS 398-10 Cultural Contexts of Pregnancy and Childbirth  (HU , 4 credits)  CBE Diversity CRN 44672
M, W 10:45 - 12:00 p.m.  
In this course, we will explore primarily American conceptions of pregnancy and childbirth, beginning with a brief history of both. We will look at current laws, medical research, and grassroots activism surrounding pregnancy and childbirth and understand how intersections of race, class, and gender impact our understandings of these acts.  Texts will include film and literature.
Professor Jones
 
WGSS 399-10 Senior Thesis  ( 2-4 credits)  CRN 42027 Instructor permission required.
WGSS Faculty
 
WGSS 430-10 Internship in Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies  (1-3 credits)  CRN 42028 Instructor permission required.
WGSS Faculty
 

WGSS 491-10 Independent Study  (3 credits)  CRN 44157  Instructor permission required.
WGSS Faculty


Summer 2019: Required Courses & Non-Required/Elective Courses

WGSS, ENGL 104-14  Good Girls and Bad Boys in the Age of Consent (HU) 
CRN 23784 / 4 credits / CBE Diversity / Prof. Jones (Session 2) online
Contemporary novels and fan fiction authors continue to use a similar trope:  typically in her first year of college, the good, virginal girl meets and lusts after the bad, sexually-experienced boy.  What happens when we take these narratives in the context of American colleges and universities that adopt policies of “affirmative consent”?  This course will read a series of recent novels and pay specific attention to how desire and sex intersect with gender.  The course will also incorporate contemporary college and university conversations around Greek Life and athletics. Questions students will be responding to include, do the novels respond to the changing policies and laws?  How do the characters understand notions of consent?  Do readers encounter heteronormative and hegemonic notions of "masculinity" and "femininity" in the books?  What happens when the students lose faith in the campus conduct system and create their own?  In addition to reading contextual material, we will read pieces of fiction including The Mockingbirds, The Luckiest Girl Alive, Beautiful Disaster, and portions of the Twilight series, including recent mashups  
 
WGSS, THTR, DES 129-11  History of Fashion and Style (HU) 
CRN 23166 / 4 credits / Prof. Hoelscher (Session 2) online
Dress and culture in the Western Hemisphere from prehistory to today. The evolution of silhouette, garment forms and technology. The relationship of fashion to politics, art and behavior. Cultural and environmental influences on human adornment.  
 
WGSS, THTR, DES 129-10  History of Fashion and Style (HU) 
CRN 23165 / 4 credits / Prof. Hoelscher (Session 1) online
Dress and culture in the Western Hemisphere from prehistory to today. The evolution of silhouette, garment forms and technology. The relationship of fashion to politics, art and behavior. Cultural and environmental influences on human adornment.  
 
WGSS, AAS, HIST 195-11  Women, Gender, Sexuality and Race in African Societies (HU) 
CRN 23350 / 4 credits / CBE Diversity / Prof. Essien (Session 2) online
This course explore the various ways in which womanhood, gender, sexuality and race is defined, constructed and articulated in African societies. The interdisciplinary course draw from historical writings, novels, biography, anthropology, political science, health and others to examine diverse activities and contributions of African women from the pre-colonial period.  
 
WGSS 196-11  Sex in the City 
CRN 23909 / 4 credits / Prof. Jessica Vander Heide (Session 1) online
This course explores how American cities fostered sexual cultures, sexual communities, and sex districts from the nineteenth to the early twenty-first centuries. Together, we will investigate the histories of prostitution and sex work, the commercialization of erotic leisure and entertainment, the development of non-heterosexual urban communities, and the policing of private and public spaces. Throughout this investigation, we will pay special attention to how gender, race, and class structured issues surrounding sex and urban space. Through analyses of films, newspapers, advertisements, guidebooks, maps, letters, diaries, cartoons, novels, and manuscripts, we will consider both how urban spaces have shaped sexuality and, conversely, how sex has shaped the contours of American cities.  
 
WGSS, HMS, SOC 341-10/ 441-10  Gender and Health (SS) 
CRN 23387 / 4 credits / CRN 23470 / 3 credits / Prof. Alang (Session 1) online
Relationships of sex differences and gender norms to disease and longevity. Influence of medical systems on women's lives and the impact of the women's movement on health care. Focus on specific topics, e.g. medicalization and commercialization of women's bodies, the politics of reproductive choices, and mental health.
 

Spring 2019: Required Courses & Non-Required/Elective Courses

WGSS 001-010  Gender and Society (SS) 
CRN 18851 / 4 credits / CBE Diversity / M, W 11:10 - 12:25 p.m. / Prof. Staff
The course introduces students to key concepts, theoretical frameworks, and interdisciplinary research in the field of Women’s and Gender Studies. Examines how gender interacts with race, age, class, sexuality, etc., to shape human consciousness and determine the social organization of human society. The course may include topics such as: gender and work; sexuality and reproduction; women’s health; media constructions of gender and race; gender, law, and public policy.   
 
WGSS, MLL, ASIA 015-010  Sex, War, Women, Art (HU) 
CRN 19043 / 4 credits / M, W 12:45 - 2:00 p.m. /Prof. Yamasaki
Through the study of selected visual and literary works in their historical and social contexts, students will gain knowledge of cultures in Japan. This course examines various cultures from the perspectives of gender and sexuality as constitutive factors of Japanese society. Materials include a film depicting a romantic life of samurai, art works by contemporary artists, and writings on sex workers impacted by the Japanese empire. No prior knowledge of Japanese language is required. An introductory course taught in English.   
 
WGSS, ENGL 104-010  What Does Creativity Look Like?  Documentary Visions (HU) 
CRN 18829 / 4 credits / T, R 2:35 - 3:50 p.m. / Prof. Handler 
What can documentary films tell us about the nature of creativity?  What defines it? Why does it matter to people? Some of the course films explore activities such as painting, music and dance that we commonly associate with the term “art.”  Others explore the role of creative imagination in other activities, including political dissent, online romance, and relationships with animals. Most of the course films are about people who have been marginalized because of their sex, race, class position, age, mental health or political beliefs. We will consider how these people use imaginative work to define themselves and transform their communities.  We will also examine how these documentaries frame their subjects, visually and narratively. The course will explore the ways in which documentary filmmaking, although committed to truth-telling, is itself always an act of creative imagination and interpretation. Finally, the course will encourage you to consider the role of creativity in your own life.   
 
WGSS, HMS, HIST 125-010  Does Sex Have a History? The History of Sexuality in the U.S. (HU) 
CRN 18841 / 4 credits / T, R 1:10 - 2:25 p.m. / Prof. Najar
This class explores the history of sexuality in the United States from the colonial era to the present. While sexuality can appear timeless and stable, sexual ideologies, categories, and behaviors have consistently evolved, and they have transformed American society in the process. While cod pieces and white wigs enhanced upper class men's apparent virility in the early Republic, the “Playboy era” saw a reliance of stereos and cars. Friendship between nineteenth-century women included intimacies that would now more typically be found in same-sex relationships and marriages. We will also study how institutions like the law, medicine, and the media have shaped sexual identities and experiences. In so doing, the class aims to develop sophisticated readers of historical and contemporary cultures.   
 
WGSS, REL, ASIA 173-010  Sex, Celibacy and Sainthood: Gender and Religioin in East Asia (HU) 
CRN 18894 / 4 credits / WI (Writing Intensive) / T, R 2:35 - 3:50 p.m. / Prof. Pitkin
This course explores themes of sexuality, celibacy, gender, and sainthood in East Asian religions. We will pay special attention to the experiences of religious women from many walks of life and time periods, from traditions including Buddhism, Daoism, and shamanism. Through film, poetry, autobiography, philosophical writing, visual art, and descriptions of visionary experience, students will encounter Buddhist and Daoist nuns, lay women, mothers, shamanic healers, oracles, activists, and royalty, from Tibet, Korea, Japan, China, and the U.S.   
 
WGSS, AAS, ENGL 195-010  Let America Be America Again:  Protest Literature from Past to Present (HU) 
CRN 17779 / 4 credits / T, R 9:20 - 10:35 a.m. / Prof. Edwards
In an America that seems increasingly divided, protest movements, practiced in conventional and nonconventional ways, have reemerged as potent and effective ways to create social change. Through studying protest literature, we will engage with historical representations and expressions of social protest in America, as well as examine the role of protest movements in our political present. Each unit in the course will ask students to think about cultural identities,
such as race, gender and sexuality, in concert with what it means to fight for the rights of those identities. We’ll explore central questions (including, what does it mean to protest? what various forms can protest take? where can protest occur and who can participate? how do the stakes vary for those enacting activism?) using a variety of sources, including articles, novels, short stories, plays, poetry, short videos, and film. Often, we’ll pair historical texts, such as the “Declaration of Sentiments and Resolutions” from the first Women’s Rights Convention at Seneca Falls in 1848, with current expressions of protest, such as the Women’s March and the MeToo movement, to gain perspective on today’s turbulent times. Course texts will include Ta-Nehisi Coates' Between the World and Me, Ava DuVernay's documentary film, 13th, Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale, and Larry Kramer's The Normal Heart.   
 
WGSS, AAS, ENGL 198-010  Love in the Time of Tinder: Relationships, Identity and Technology (HU) 
CRN 18816 / 4 credits / CBE Diversity / M, W, F 10:10 - 11:00 a.m. / Prof. Heidebrink-Bruno 
In this 100-level course, we will explore how people use various kinds of digital, electronic, and social technologies to engage in relationships with one another, and with the technology. Through a series of readings and films, students will:
·       Analyze the role of technology in personal relationships, and consider larger social and global issues concerning the production, use, and reliance upon technologies.
·       Consider the gendered and racial components that affect how individuals interact with technologies.
·       Speculate why writers and film-makers are preoccupied with futuristic technologies in science fiction and speculative fiction. What do these preoccupations reveal about our current historical moment and fears?  How will technologies continue to impact the way we communicate and bond with one another in the future?   
 
WGSS 271-010  Independent Reading and Research (HU, SS) 
Instructor permission required.
CRN 16466 / 1-4 credits / Prof. Najar
Independent study of selected topics designated and executed in close collaboration with a member of Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies faculty. May be repeated for elective credit. Prerequisite: consent of the WGSS program director.   
 
WGSS, MLL, ENGL, GERM, FILM 303-010  Grimms' Fairy Tales: Folklore, Feminism, Film (HU) 
CRN 19002 / 4 credits / CBE Global / M, W 2:35 - 3:50 p.m. / Prof. Stegmann
This intercultural history of the Grimms’ fairy tales investigates how folktale types and gender stereotypes developed and became models for children and adults. The course covers the literary fairy tale in Germany as well as Europe and America. Versions of “Little Red Riding Hood”, “Cinderella”, or “Sleeping Beauty” exist not only in the Grimms’ collection but in films and many forms of world literature. Modern authors have rewritten fairy tales in feminist ways, promoting social change. Taught in English. German language students may receive a German component.   
 
WGSS, ENGL 304-010  Women/Revolution Early America (HU) 
CRN 17997 / 4 credits / CBE Diversity / T, R 10:45 - 12:00 p.m. / Prof. Gordon
The American Revolution happened only a century after Mary Rowlandson was abducted by Native Americans (1675) and women were burned alive during the Salem Witch Trials (1692). In this course, we will read the writing that women produced—and some writing about women—to explore how opportunities and possibilities for women transformed (or remained the same) during the long eighteenth century. Were early American women able to participate in public life? If so, which women and under what circumstances? Did early American values such as liberty and independence extend to women? If so, which women and for what reasons? Did women feel like they had a “revolution” in 1776? We will read captivity narratives, poetry, novels, and other public writing—by authors such as Mary Rowlandson, Phyllis Wheatley, Hannah Griffits, Susannah Wright, Hannah Foster, Susanna Rowson, Charles Brockden Brown, and Mercy Otis Warren—to help us explore these issues   
 
WGSS, ENGL 304-011  Women/Revolution Early America 
CRN 18097 / 3 credits / Graduate Students Only / T, R 10:45 - 12:00 p.m. / Prof. Gordon
The American Revolution happened only a century after Mary Rowlandson was abducted by Native Americans (1675) and women were burned alive during the Salem Witch Trials (1692). In this course, we will read the writing that women produced—and some writing about women—to explore how opportunities and possibilities for women transformed (or remained the same) during the long eighteenth century. Were early American women able to participate in public life? If so, which women and under what circumstances? Did early American values such as liberty and independence extend to women? If so, which women and for what reasons? Did women feel like they had a “revolution” in 1776? We will read captivity narratives, poetry, novels, and other public writing—by authors such as Mary Rowlandson, Phyllis Wheatley, Hannah Griffits, Susannah Wright, Hannah Foster, Susanna Rowson, Charles Brockden Brown, and Mercy Otis Warren—to help us explore these issues   
 
WGSS, PSYC, HMS 334-010  The Psychology of Body Image and Eating Disorders (SS) 
Restricted to WGSS majors/minors.
CRN 18671 / 4 credits / T 7:10 - 10:00 p.m. / Prof. Lomauro
The course addresses the psychosocial aspects of the development of healthy and unhealthy body image and eating disorders. The roles of personality traits/individual factors, family and interpersonal functioning, and cultural factors will be examined, as will the impact of representations of body image in mass media. Public health and psychological interventions for prevention and treatment will be explored. Personal accounts/memoirs, clinical case presentations, and documentary and dramatic films will be incorporated in the presentation of topics.  (Open only to declared HMS minors, declared WGSS minors, or those who have taken WGSS 001)   
 
WGSS 350-010  Seminar in Feminist Theory (ND) 
CRN 18852 / 4 credits / T, R 2:35 - 3:50 p.m. / Prof. Krasas
An upper-level seminar serving as a capstone experience that challenges students to systematize insights gained from introductory and elective courses through the more deeply analytical lens of feminist theory. Prerequisite: WGSS 001 or WGSS 101 or consent of the WGSS program director.   
 
WGSS, MLL 403-010  Grimms' Fairy Tales: Folklore, Feminism, Film 
CRN 19004 / 3 credits / M, W 2:35 - 3:50 p.m. / Prof. Stegmann
This intercultural history of the Grimms' fairy tales investigates how folktale types and gender stereotypes developed and became models for children and adults. The course covers the literary fairy tale in Germany as well as Europe and America. Versions of "Little Red Riding Hood", "Cinderella", or "Sleeping Beauty" exist not only in the Grimms' collection but in films and many forms of world literature. Modern authors have rewritten fairy tales in feminist ways, promoting social change. Taught in English. German language students may receive a German component.   
 
WGSS, CIE 405-010  Experiencing the United Nations: Gender and Education in International Development 
CRN 18853 / 3 credits / R 4:10 - 7:00 p.m. / Prof. Kong
Building on the Lehigh University/United Nations partnership initiative, this course provides a structured practical experience for students to learn about the dynamics of NGO/UN relationships by representing one of the underrepresented international NGOs at the United Nations. Equips students with necessary experience, understanding, and skills in international education development such as policy brief writing and education sector analysis.   
 
WGSS 450-010  Seminar in Feminist Theory 
CRN 18853 / 3 credits / T, R 2:35 - 3:50 p.m. / Prof. Krasas
An upper-level seminar serving as a capstone experience that challenges students to systematize insights gained from introductory and elective courses through the more deeply analytical lens of feminist theory. Prerequisite: WGSS 001 or WGSS 101 or consent of the WGSS program director.