Courses

Academic Calendar - Fall 2014

Registration for Fall semester: Monday, August 25 through Friday, September 5
Classes begin: Monday, August 25
Pacing break: Monday and Tuesday, October 6 & 7
Classes end: Friday, December 5
Final Exams: Tuesday, December 9 through Wednesday, December 17

Full Academic Calendars (taken right from the Registrar's website)
Lehigh University Course Catalog


Fall 2014: Required Courses & Non-Required/Elective Courses
WGSS 001-10 Women & Men in Society (SS)  4 credits    CRN 48770
The course introduces students to key concepts, theoretical frameworks, and interdisciplinary research in the field of Women’s and Gender Studies. Examines how gender interacts with race, age, class, sexuality, etc., to shape human consciousness and determine the social organization of human society. The course may include topics such as: gender and work; sexuality and reproduction; women’s health; media constructions of gender and race; gender, law, and public policy. Professor Krasas T, R / 2:35  - 3:50 p.m.
 
**CANCELED WGSS, ENG 104-10 Special Topics in Gender Studies : Love Factually (HU)  4 credits      CRN 49538
What is this thing we call love? Does it exist? What does it look like? How have our fantasies about love transformed over the past century? This course will consider love through a range of past and present films, novels, short stories, and essays. We will discuss various kinds of love that we value—romantic, philanthropic, familial—and that we reject: narcissistic, melancholic. Among other questions, the class will consider: Is love selfish or selfless? Does our culture persuade us to love in certain ways as opposed to others? Texts for the class will include films such as Closer (2004) and Twilight (2008); and novels such Stephen Chbosky's The Perks of Being a Wallflower (1999) and F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby (1925).  Professor Nagy  T, R / 1:10 2:25 p.m.

WGSS, ENG 104-11 Special Topics in Gender Studies : Viewing Mad Men: Window, Mirror and Screen (HU)  4 credits      CRN 49540
Mad Men, a television drama about a 1960s advertising agency, has been acclaimed for its complex characters, sophisticated storytelling and meticulous recreation of the world of the early 60s.  However, critics have debated the accuracy of Mad Men’s representation of the 60s, and argued over the show’s viewpoint on the world it portrays. The course will focus in particular on the cultural significance of advertising, and the social position of women in the early 60s.  Professor Handler M, W / 2:35 - 3:50 p.m.

WGSS, HIST 124-10 Women in America (SS)  4 credits      CRN 48771
Roles of women in American society from colonial to present times : attitudes toward women, female sexuality, women's work, and feminism.  Professor Cooper T, R / 10:45 - 12:00 p.m.

PHIL 146-10 Philosophy and Gender (HU)  4 credits    WGSS Attribute  CRN 49277
An examination of concepts, values, and assumptions relevant to gender in our diverse society, investigating how they affect our lives in both concrete and symbolic ways. Questions to be considered include: What is a woman? What is a man? What does gender have to do with sexual ethics? What does gender have to do with power and oppression? What are the ways in which gender intersects with sexuality, race, class, and religion? What are the theoretical and political consequences of such intersections? Special attention will be paid to how gendered assumptions color our understanding of knowledge production, experiences of embodiment and emotion, public and private activities, and the nature of ethical decision-making.  Professor Dillon T, R / 9:20 - 10:35 a.m.

**CANCELED WGSS, HMS 197-10 Breast-Feeding and Public Health (HU)  4 credits      CRN 49500
Although a seemingly private issue, the subject of infant breastfeeding has long been informed by public and medical trends. This course will examine breastfeeding from an interdisciplinary public health perspective. Historical and social contexts that shape our understanding of this practice will be considered, from breastfeeding in public to commercialization. We will also consider health concerns for mothers and infants (including emotional and psychological as well as physical), health disparities, and strategies for supporting freely chosen breastfeeding practices. This course also includes an experiential learning component in which students will help create sustainable infrastructure changes based on best-practice strategies and local community needs.  Professor Martell T, R / 1:10 - 2:25 p.m.  WGSS and HMS  majors and minors may register without permisson

**CANCELED REL, AAS, WGSS 198-10 Identity Wars and the Battle for Authenticity (HU)  4 credits      CRN 49339
As identities proliferate so does the ongoing battle for recognition, power and authority. From race, religion, citizenship, sexuality, law, class, gender, etc., – much of society seems engaged in an endless struggle over and for authenticity, access, control, and influence in competing spheres of significance (i.e., popular culture, academic discourse, virtual reality). We’ll explore what’s at stake in ensuing culture wars and what strategies help construct and maintain identity claims/positions by applying various intellectual projects/approaches to popular cultural source material.  Professor Miller T, R / 10:45 - 12:00 p.m.

ARTS 250 Communication, Cultures, Behaviors and Attitudes (ND)  4 credits    AAS, WGSS Attributes
Section 10 -  CRN 49481;  W / 1:10 - 4:00 p.m.
Section 11 - CRN 49482;  R / 1:10 - 4:00 p.m.
Writing-intensive experiential focus on communications, development of social roles and life skills required for effective functioning in a changing society in America and globally. Models of group processes; small group projects; communications; critical thinking and its application to course content; cognitive processes in handling individual differences in race, gender, class, religion, disabilities, sexual harassment, religions of the world, sexual orientation, and culture; synthesis of class experiences with readings and discussions; and social role implications on choices. The application of lessons learned in the course to real life situations such as structured fieldwork will be required in addition to in class work. As part of the “hands-on” experience, students will be required to provide regular written and oral reports of activity and then write a detailed analysis/assessment report of particular issues and lessons learned. Students may not receive credit for both Arts 250 and Comm 65.  Professor Odi

WGSS 271-10 Independent Reading and Research (SS/HU)  1-4 credits      CRN 48773
Independent study of selected topics designated and executed in close collaboration with a member of Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies faculty. Students taking this course as a requirement for the minor must elect at least the three-credit option. May be repeated for elective credit. Prerequisite: consent of the WGSS program director.  Professor Krasas

WGSS, ENG 304 Special Topics in Gender Studies II: Sex and Sexuality in Contemporary American Fiction (HU)   
Section 10 – CRN 49542; 4 credits
Section 11 – CRN 49544; 3 credits  (graduate students only)
How do contemporary authors depict various forms of sexual encounter and how do their fictional representations invite readers to engage with cultural understandings of normative and non-normative sexuality, desire, and activity?  How do contemporary authors engage with hegemonic discourses that promote marital reproductive heterosexual coupling? Further, how do authors of the post-1945 period navigate McCarthy era demonization of homosexuality as well as medical discourses that deploy the “psychiatrization of perverse pleasure” (Foucault) and legal discourses that criminalize “perverse” sexual activity? From the late 1940s to our present moment, discussions of sex and sexuality have taken place in political, medical, and legal spheres about normal and abnormal sexual behavior as well as the ways that communities “should” promote “normal” sexualities, regulate and prosecute “deviance,” and/or medically treat those who fail to conform to cultural norms.  Conservative discourses of sexuality have been countered and challenged by the “sexual revolution” of the 1960s, the second wave of the feminist movement, and the LGBTQ movement as activists and theorists incited public discussion of cultural norms. So, too, literary authors have been inspired by the aforementioned discourses and movements to write about sex, to engage with sexual identities, and to critique hegemonic understandings of normativity.  This course will follow authors through literary engagement with sexuality, including novelistic depiction of normative relationships in the form of heterosexual union as well a non-normative portrayals of heterosexual encounter, fictional accounts of coming out and into queer identities, as well as texts that eschew sexual identity.  Fictional texts addressed may include works by James Baldwin, John Updike, Toni Morrison, John Rechy, Samuel Delany, Joanna Russ, Ursula Le Guin, Monique Wittig, and Audre Lorde.  Although we primarily will focus on novels, students should be prepared to read some theoretical texts during the semester. Professor Foltz T, R / 2:35 - 3:50 p.m.

WGSS 330-10 Internship in Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies (SS)  1-4 credits      CRN 48774
WGSS 430-10 Internship in Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies (SS)  1-3 credits      CRN 48781
Supervised work in women's organizations or settings, combined with an analysis, in the form of a major paper, of the experience using the critical perspectives gained in WGSS  courses. Placements arranged to suit individual interests and career goals; can include social service agencies, women's advocacy groups, political organizations, etc. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: WGSS 001 or WGSS 101  and consent of the WGSS program director.  Professor Krasas

WGSS,SSP 331-10 Gendered Experience of Globalization (SS)  4 credits    GS  Attribute  CRN 48775
Women and men experience globalization differently and globalization affects women in different cultural and national contexts. Gender stratification has been intensified by the transnational flow of goods and people. Course provides students with a survey of new development in feminist theories on globalization and on gender stratification and development, and links these theoretical frameworks to empirical research about gender issues that have become more prominent with globalization.  Professor Zhang T, R / 10:45 - 12:00 p.m.

WGSS, SSP, HMS 341-10 Women and Health (SS)  4 credits      CRN 48641
WGSS, SSP 441-10 Women and Health (SS) 3 credits      CRN 48993
Relationships of women to the medical system. Influence of medicine on women's lives and the impact of the women's movement on health care. Professor Hicks; Open to WGSS, HMS ans SSP declared majors/minors only M, W / 12:45 - 2:00 p.m.

WGSS 350-10 Seminar in Feminist Theory (ND)  4 credits      CRN 49518
WGSS 450-10 Seminar in Feminist Theory (ND)  3 credits      CRN 49519
An upper-level seminar serving as a capstone experience that challenges students to systematize insights gained from introductory and elective courses through the more deeply analytical lens of feminist theory. Prerequisite: WGSS 001 or WGSS 101 or consent of the WGSS program director.  Professor Martell M, W / 2:35 - 3:50 p.m.

WGSS 373 Internship in Women's Center (SS)  1-3 credits     
Section 10 - CRN 48777; Professor Jones
Section 11 - CRN 48778; Professor DeSipio
Supervised work in the Women's Center allow WGSS students to bring critical perspectives on women and gender into the campus community. Students who wish to fulfill the internship requirement of the WGSS minor must take the Women's Center internship for (3). This course may be repeated for credit up to a maximum of 6 credits. Prerequisites: WGSS 001 or WGSS 101 and consent of the Women's Center director.   

HMS, WGSS 398-10 Cultural Contexts of Pregnancy and Childbirth (HU)  4 credits      CRN 49502
In this course, we will explore primarily American conceptions of pregnancy and childbirth, beginning with a brief history of both. We will look at current laws, medical research, and grassroots activism surrounding pregnancy and childbirth and understand how intersections of race, class, and gender impact our understandings of these acts.  Texts will include film and literature.  Professor Jones M, W / 11:10 - 12:25 p.m.

WGSS 399-10 Senior Thesis (ND)  2-4 credits      CRN 48780
Research during senior year culminating in a senior thesis.  May be repeated up to a total of 4 credits.  Prerequisite: consent of the Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies program director.  Professor Krasas

SSP, WGSS 418-10 Gendered Experience of Globalization (SS)  3 credits      CRN 48776
Women and men experience globalization differently and globalization affects women in different cultural and national contexts. Gender stratification has been intensified by the transnational flow of goods and people. Course provides students with a survey of new development in feminist theories on globalization and on gender stratification and development, and links these theoretical frameworks to empirical research about gender issues that have become more prominent with globalization.  Professor Zhang T, R / 10:45 - 12:00 p.m.

ENG 433-10 Sex, Gender, and Sexuality in the Middle Ages (ND)  3 credits  WGSS  CRN 48542
This course examines the strategies that a diverse group of medieval texts use to construct normative ideals of sex, gender, and sexuality and to imagine (and, often, simultaneously refuse) alternative possibilities. This inquiry aims, to borrow Joan W. Scott’s words, “to disrupt the notion of fixity, to discover the nature of the debate or repression that leads to the appearance of timeless permanence” of binary categories like masculinity and femininity, heterosexuality and homosexuality, and male and female. We will pay particular attention to how these representations of marriage, virginity, romantic love, sexual transgression, erotic pleasure, and the body reflect philosophical, economic, and theological conflicts about community belonging, social hierarchy, national identity, and faith.

Because debates about gender and sexuality take place across a range of social and political institutions, course readings include legal statutes and cases, penitential manuals, and medical treatises, alongside literary texts in order to offer a nuanced account of the ways that gender and sexuality signified power relations in the Middle Ages. Readings include Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Cleanness, Alain de Lille’s Complaint of Nature, the Katherine Group, selections from Gower’s Confessio Amantis, and selections from Aquinas, Augustine, and St. Paul, among others. To sharpen our understanding of what is at stake in any analysis of this historical archive, readings in feminist theory and queer theory will inform our inquiry. Texts will be in Middle English and in translation. Prior experience with Middle English is helpful, but not required. Professor Edwards M, W / 2:35 - 3:50 p.m. English department permission required.

Summer 2014 Course Offerings

WGSS, HIST 124-10 Women in America (SS)  4 credits    CRN 21968
Roles of women in American society from colonial to present times : attitudes toward women, female sexuality, women's work, and feminism. Professor Cooper Summer Session 1 – M, T, W, R / 1:00 - 2:35 p.m.

WGSS, THTR, DES, WGSS 129 History of Fashion and Style (HU)  4 credits   
Dress and culture in the Western Hemisphere from prehistory to today. The evolution of silhouette, garment forms and technology. The relationship of fashion to politics, art and behavior. Cultural and environmental influences on human adornment. Professor Hoelscher
Section 10 - Summer Session 1 -  on-line - CRN 21774
Section 11 - Summer Session 1 -  on-line - CRN 21775

ENG 187-10 Reading Showtime’s Dexter (HU)  4 credits  WGSS Attribute  CRN 20237
This course will examine crucial episodes from the 8-season run of Showtime’s Dexter, looking at its recurrent visual and narrative motifs (blood, monsters, animals), to help us explore the central questions the series raises: What is evil? Is killing ever justified? Is representing repeated scenes of graphic violence on TV ever justified? Are people born bad or made bad? We will also explore Dexter’s literary antecedent      s (the gothic, naturalism), and its cultural and political significance (including its politics of race and gender). Professor Keetley  Summer Session 1 – on-line

ENG 195-12 Made to Kill: Female Violence in Popular Cinema (HU)  4 credits  WGSS Attribute  CRN 21966
This course will examine how mainstream and independent movies have portrayed female killers and consider how these films can be read as responses to American feminism since the 1970s.  We will consider the different kinds of female characters who kill, whom they kill, and why, in films that have become cultural landmarks in the ongoing debate about the relation of violence to female identity and gender roles. Films include The Hunger Games, Black Swan, Carrie, The Silence of the Lambs and Thelma and Louise.   Readings will include critical essays, contemporary reviews, and feminist theory. Professor Handler Summer Session 2 - T, R / 4:00 – 7:0 p.m.

WGSS, HMS 196-10 Breast-Feeding and Public Health (HU)  4 credits    CRN 21982
Although a seemingly private issue, the subject of infant breastfeeding has long been informed by public and medical trends. This course will examine breastfeeding from an interdisciplinary public health perspective. Historical and social contexts that shape our understanding of this practice will be considered, from breastfeeding in public to commercialization. We will also consider health concerns for mothers and infants (including emotional and psychological as well as physical), health disparities, and strategies for supporting freely chosen breastfeeding practices. This course also includes an experiential learning component in which students will help create sustainable infrastructure changes based on best-practice strategies and local community needs. Professor Martell Summer Session 1 on-line

ENG 196-10 The Modern American Horror Film (HU)  4 credits  WGSS Attribute  CRN 21343
This course examines the changing shape of the American horror film from its inception in 1932 with Dracula. We will move from the classic horror of the 30s to the emergence of the slasher film in the 70s, the self-reflexive horror of the 90s, the faux-documentary horror at the end of the century, to the virulent renaissance of the genre in our post 9/11 world, including so-called “torture porn” and the “possession” film—the return of the angry dead. Professor Keetley Summer Session 1 on-line

WGSS 271-11 Independent Reading and Research (SS/HU)  1-4 credits   
Independent study of selected topics designated and executed in close collaboration with a member of Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies faculty. Students taking this course as a requirement for the minor must elect at least the three-credit option. May be repeated for elective credit. Prerequisite: consent of the WGSS program director. Professor Krasas
Section 10 – Summer Session 1 - CRN 21715
Section 11 - Summer Session 2 - CRN 21712
Section 12 – Summer Session full - CRN 21859

WGSS 330 Internship in Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies (SS)  1-4 credits   
Section 10 – Summer Session 1 - CRN 21716
Section 11 - Summer Session 2 - CRN 21714

WGSS 430 Internship in Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies (SS)  1-3 credits   
Section 10 – Summer Session 1 - CRN 21719
Section 11 - Summer Session 2 - CRN 21723
Supervised work in women's organizations or settings, combined with an analysis, in the form of a major paper, of the experience using the critical perspectives gained in WGSS  courses. Placements arranged to suit individual interests and career goals; can include social service agencies, women's advocacy groups, political organizations, etc. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: WGSS 001 or WGSS 101  and consent of the WGSS program director. Professor Krasas

WGSS, PSYC, HMS 334-10 The Psychology of Body Image and Eating Disorders (SS)  4 credits    CRN 21793
The course addresses the psychosocial aspects of the development of healthy and unhealthy body image and eating disorders. The roles of personality traits/individual factors, family and interpersonal functioning, and cultural factors will be examined, as will the impact of representations of body image in mass media. Public health and psychological interventions for prevention and treatment will be explored. Personal accounts/memoirs, clinical case presentations, and documentary and dramatic films will be incorporated in the presentation of topics.  (Open only to declared HMS minors, declared WGSS minors, or those who have taken WGSS 001) Professor Lomauro Summer Session 2 -  T, R / 6:00 – 8:50 p.m.   

WGSS, SSP, HMS 341-10 Women and Health (SS)  4 credits    CRN 21740
WGSS, SSP 441-10 Women and Health (SS) 3 credits   CRN TBD

Relationships of women to the medical system. Influence of medicine on women's lives and the impact of the women's movement on health care. Professor Hicks  Summer Session 1 - M, W / 12:45 - 2:00 p.m.

WGSS 373 Internship in Women's Center (SS)  1-3 credits   
Supervised work in the Women's Center allow WGSS students to bring critical perspectives on women and gender into the campus community. Students who wish to fulfill the internship requirement of the WGSS minor must take the Women's Center internship for (3). This course may be repeated for credit up to a maximum of 6 credits. Prerequisites: WGSS 001 or WGSS 101 and consent of the Women's Center director.
Section 10 - Summer Session 1 -    CRN 21717; Professor Jones
Section 11 - Summer Session 1 -   CRN 21718; Professor DeSipio

WGSS 491 Independent Study: Theories of Gender and Feminism (SS)  3 credits   
Individually supervised course in area of women, gender, and sexuality studies not ordinarily covered in regularly listed courses. Prerequisite: consent of the WGSS program director. Professor Krasas
Section 10 – Summer Session 1 - CRN 21720
Section 11 - Summer Session 2 - CRN 21724

Spring 2014: Required Courses & Non-Required/Elective Courses

WGSS 001 Women & Men in Society  (4 credits) (SS) 
Section 10, CRN 17859  -  M, W, 2:35 p.m. - 3:50 p.m.  Professor Edwards 
Section 11, CRN 17860  - T, TR, 10:45 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.  Professor Martell

The course introduces students to key concepts, theoretical frameworks, and interdisciplinary research in the field of Women’s and Gender Studies. Examines how gender interacts with race, age, class, sexuality, etc., to shape human consciousness and determine the social organization of human society. The course may include topics such as: gender and work; sexuality and reproduction; women’s health; media constructions of gender and race; gender, law, and public policy.

WGSS, MLL, ASIA, HIST 198-10 Women in Pre-Industrial China, CRN 18850 (4 credits) (HU)   
M, W, 11:10 a.m. - 12:25 p.m.
This class will look at readings in English about and by Chinese women from antiquity up to the 19th century. Readings will touch on women in the fields of history, literature, medicine, philosophy, religion, and sociology. Discussions will focus on understanding the traditional framework for Chinese women's experience, how it evolved over time and place, and how aspects of this gendered power structure are still salient today.  Professor Cook

WGSS 271-10 Independent Reading and Research, CRN 17869 (1-4 credits) (SS/HU)
 Independent study of selected topics designated and executed in close collaboration with a member of Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies faculty. Students taking this course as a requirement for the minor must elect at least the three-credit option. May be repeated for elective credit. Prerequisite: consent of the WGSS program director.   Professor Krasas

WGSS, MLL, GCP, GERM 303-10 Grimms' Fairy Tales: Folklore, Feminism, Film, CRN 17871 (4 credits) (HU)  M, W, 2:35 p.m. - 3:50 p.m.
This intercultural history of the Grimms’ fairy tales investigates how folktale types and gender stereotypes developed and became models for children and adults. The course covers the literary fairy tale in Germany as well as Europe and America. Versions of “Little Red Riding Hood”, “Cinderella”, or “Sleeping Beauty” exist not only in the Grimms’ collection but in films and many forms of world literature. Modern authors have rewritten fairy tales in feminist ways, promoting social change. Taught in English. German language students may receive a German component.   Professor Stegmann

WGSS, SSP, HIST 325 History of Sexuality and the Family in the U.S., (SS)  
M, W, 2:35 p.m. - 3:50 p.m.
Section 10 (4 credits) – CRN 18554
Section 11 (3 credits) – CRN 18891 Graduate Students Only
Changing conceptions of sexuality and the role of women, men, and children in the family and society from the colonial to the post-World War II era. Emphasis on the significance of socioeconomic class and cultural background. Topics: family structure, birth control, legal constraints, marriage, divorce, and prostitution.  Professor Najar

WGSS 330-10 Internship in Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, CRN 17875 (1-4 credits) (SS)  Supervised work in women's organizations or settings, combined with an analysis, in the form of a major paper, of the experience using the critical perspectives gained in WGSS  courses. Placements arranged to suit individual interests and career goals; can include social service agencies, women's advocacy groups, political organizations, etc. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: WGSS 001 or WGSS 101  and consent of the WGSS program director.   Professor Krasas

WGSS, PSYC, HMS 334-10 The Psychology of Body Image and Eating Disorders, CRN 18915 (4 credits) (SS)  
T, 7:10 p.m. - 10:00 p.m.
The course addresses the psychosocial aspects of the development of healthy and unhealthy body image and eating disorders. The roles of personality traits/individual factors, family and interpersonal functioning, and cultural factors will be examined, as will the impact of representations of body image in mass media. Public health and psychological interventions for prevention and treatment will be explored. Personal accounts/memoirs, clinical case presentations, and documentary and dramatic films will be incorporated in the presentation of topics.  HMS and WGSS majors/minors can register without permission.  Professor Lomauro

SSP, WGSS 365-10 Inequalities at Work, CRN 18845 (4 credits) (SS)  
M, W, 12:45 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.
Primary focus is on race, gender, and class as axes of disadvantage and privilege in work and employment. We will explore both theories and empirical studies of inequality as well as their social, political, and practical ramifications for the workplace. The course will be conducted seminar-style and the class will rely heavily on student participation.   Professor Krasas

WGSS 373  Internship in Women's Center, (1-3 credits) (SS)
Section 10, CRN 17878   Professor Jones    
Section 11 , CRN 17879  Professor DeSipio
Supervised work in the Women's Center allow WGSS students to bring critical perspectives on women and gender into the campus community. Students who wish to fulfill the internship requirement of the WGSS minor must take the Women's Center internship for (3). This course may be repeated for credit up to a maximum of 6 credits. Prerequisites: WGSS 001 or WGSS 101 and consent of the Women's Center director.

WGSS, AAS 396 Politcs and Poetics of Black Feminist Thought, (HU)   
T, TR, 2:35 p.m. - 3:50 p.m.
Section 10 (4 credits) – CRN 18934  
Section 11 (3 credits) – CRN  18935  Graduate Students Only
An interdisciplinary examination of twentieth-century Black feminist thought, especially interested in how Black women writers have troubled hegemonic definitions of “theory,” “activism,” and “feminism.” Exploring fiction, poetry, theory, music, and art we will delve into important issues such as the politics of respectability and the relationship among knowledge, consciousness, and empowerment. In addition to considering each artists’ unique political and poetic aesthetic, we will also imagine possibilities for social justice emerging from intersections among readings. Course will including works by Zora Neale Hurston, Audre Lorde, Hortense Spillers, Joan Morgan, and bell hooks, among others.  Professor Martell

WGSS, SSP 398-10 Sexual Identities, CRN 17880 (4 credits) (SS) 
T, TR, 2:35 p.m. - 3:50 p.m.
This course will explore sexual identities that are often misunderstood and have been subjected to subjugation within mainstream society. We will use identity theories to explore how these identities are developed, how they intersect with other identities including race and gender, and how they interact with dominant sexual identities and dominant discourse.  Topics include homosexuality, bisexuality, transsexualism, intersex, kink, fetishes and philias.   This course will explore sexual identities that are often misunderstood and have been subjected to subjugation within mainstream society. We will use identity theories to explore how these identities are developed, how they intersect with other identities including race and gender, and how they interact with dominant sexual identities and dominant discourse.  Topics include homosexuality, bisexuality, transsexualism, intersex, kink, fetishes and philias.   Professor DeSipio

WGSS 399-10 Senior Thesis, CRN 17882 (2-4 credits) (ND)  
Research during senior year culminating in a senior thesis.  May be repeated up to a total of 4 credits.  Prerequisite: consent of the Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies program director.   Professor Krasas

WGSS, MLL 403-10 Grimms' Fairy Tales: Folklore, Feminism, Film, CRN 17872 (3 credits) (HU)  
M, W, 2:35 p.m. - 3:50 p.m.
See description under WGSS, MLL 303-10  Professor Stegmann

WGSS 430-10 Internship in Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, CRN 17883 (1-3 credits) (SS)  Internship related to women, gender, and sexuality studies. Supervised by WGSS faculty. Prerequisite: consent of the WGSS program director.  Professor Krasas

WGSS, SSP 465-10 Inequalities at Work, CRN 18844 (3 credits) (SS)  
M, W, 12:45 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.
See description under WGSS, SSP 365-10  Professor Krasas

WGSS 491-10 Independent Study: Theories of Gender and Feminism, CRN 17884 (3 credits) (SS)  
Drawing its topic from the now famous Scholar and Feminist IX conference on sexuality, held at Barnard College in 1982, this course explores “Pleasure and Danger” in varied accounts of the relationship between sex and gender. In the first half of the course, we will explore different theoretical models for thinking gendered suffering and pleasure, with a particular focus on the relationship between feminist and queer theories from the ‘Sex Wars’ of the early ‘80s through the rise of queer theory out of gay and lesbian studies in the early ‘90s: How might we describe the relationship between sex and gender? What are the analytical and political costs and benefits of thinking through sex and gender together? Of—if possible—splitting them apart? In the second half of the course, we will explore the current legacies and possible futures of these debates about pleasure and harm by examining how they have influenced recent trends in scholarship on gender and sexuality. As we read the course texts, we will pay particular attention to critical analyses (and uses) of language as a symptom or mechanism of gendered harms and as a resource for pleasure and transformation.   Professor Krasas

ENG 196-10 The American Horror Film, CRN 15058 (4 credits) (HU)  
T, TR, 1:10 p.m. - 12:25 p.m. 
This course examines the changing shape of the American horror film from its inception in 1932 with Dracula. We will move from the classic horror of the 30s to the emergence of the slasher film in the 70s, the self-reflexive horror of the 90s, the faux-documentary horror at the end of the century, to the virulent renaissance of the genre in our post 9/11 world, including so-called “torture porn” and the “possession” film—the return of the angry dead.   Professor Keetley

ENG 198- 10 Creativity and Identity on Screen, CRN 18492 (4 credits) (HU)  
T, TR, 2:35 p.m. - 3:50 p.m. with film screenings Tuesdays 7 – 9 p.m.
We’ll watch films about liars, graffiti artists, Facebook relationships, YouTube diaries, and a would-be reality TV star who got eaten by a bear. We’ll study autobiographical films, fiction films, and documentaries about how we create ourselves and the world around us.  Films include Exit Through the Gift Shop, Grizzly Man, Velvet Goldmine, Catfish, and Rize. You’ll have the opportunity to explore the nature of creativity and identity both by analyzing films and through a creative project of your own.  Professor Handler

ENG 201-11 Sirens and Mermaids:  Myths and Tales, CRN 17686 (4 credits) (HU)  
T, TR, 10:45 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
From Greek mythology to “The Little Mermaid,” the mermaid is a powerful symbol of gender, transformation, mystery, sensuality, the unknown, death—and Starbucks coffee—in contemporary culture. Like her ancient sister, the Siren, she is part-human and part-beast, beautiful, dangerous, and “appears” everywhere in the world. In this course students will read myths and tales—ancient and modern—about Sirens, mermaids, and other goddesses, and use them as inspirations and springboards for their own stories, which will be discussed in an informal, constructive workshop atmosphere.   Professor Setton

ENG 364 Shakespeare to Milton:  Gender, Poetry, and Politics in the 17th C, (HU) 
T, TR, 10:45 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
Section 10 (4 credits) – CRN 18494  
Section 11 (3 credits) – CRN 18496 Graduate Students Only
Seventeenth-century England was marked by intellectual, political, and religious upheaval. During this transformative period, poetry served multiple and sometimes conflicting ends: poems were crafted to seduce, to praise, to mourn, to mock, to overthrow, to rebuild. We will begin our course with the erotic epyllions written by William Shakespeare and Christopher Marlowe in the 1590s, wind our way through sonnet sequences and epic romance, compare the wit of Ben Jonson to that of Aemilia Lanyer, assess England from the New World with Anne Bradstreet, explore science and friendship with John Donne, Margaret Cavendish, and Katherine Philips, and ascend to the heavens through the Biblical epics of John Milton and Lucy Hutchinson. Our readings will be drawn from both canonical and non-canonical authors, and we will be attuned to the cultural contexts and historical events that influenced the production of poetry by individuals of different genders and social classes. We will pay particular attention to how ideas about gender—especially women’s social and cultural positions—played a role in English poetic and political life.   Professor Lay

ENG 372 The Victorian New Woman (HU)  
T, TR, 9:20 a.m. - 10:35 a.m.
Section 10 (4 credits) – CRN 18499
Section 11 (3 credits) – CRN 18500 Graduate Students Only
Victorian discussions of the proper woman and appropriate feminine behavior and identity created what became known by the middle of the nineteenth century as the Woman Question.  As various writers and thinkers attempted to delineate criteria for the proper female figure, designate the appropriate spaces for women, and categorize different kinds of proper and improper women, other writers and thinkers responded with alternative visions of feminized social/sexual subjectivity.  This course will examine both these cultural and political discourses as well as the literary responses to such discourses.  We will begin with mid-century tracts on the Woman Question and move through treatises that demonstrate compelling interrelationships between this conversation and topics such as female sexuality, raciology, eugenics, and imperialism.  We will read such cultural and political thinkers as Sarah Lewis, John Stuart Mill, Sarah Stickney Ellis, Charles Darwin, Sarah Grand, Charles Galton, Mona Caird, Thomas Huxley, and Matthew Arnold.  We will consistently complement such reading with literary texts written by and about the emergence of the Victorian New Woman, including Eliza Lynn Linton’s The Rebel of the Family, Amy Levy’s The Romance of a Shop, Olive Schriener’s Story of an African Farm, George Gissing’s The Odd Woman, Ella Hepworth Dixon’s Story of A Modern Woman, Thomas Hardy’s Jude the Obscure, and Grant Allen’s The Woman Who Did.  If we can locate an available text, I would like to end the course with Florence Dixie’s late-Victorian feminist utopian novel, Gloriana; or, the Revolution of 1900.  My hope is that the course will allow us to explore various ways in which literary discussions of the Victorian New Woman take up, respond to, and re-imagine cultural and political discussions of The Woman Question.


Detailed Course Outlines

2007 Spring     Summer     Fall
2008 Spring     Summer     Fall
2009 Spring     Summer     Fall
2010 Spring     Summer     Fall
2011 Spring     Summer     Fall
2012 Spring     Summer     Fall

2013 Spring     Summer     Fall
2014 Spring     Summer     Fall
2015 Spring     Summer     Fall